Kinbaku Salon with Bergborg

Tsujimura, Osada Eikichi, Akechi Denki

After a first, very successful Kinbaku Salon in April 2019 in Berlin, we welcome back Berg Borg for another deep dive into the pioneer years of Kinbaku. Historical materials such as artworks, books, magazines, films and original texts translated from Japanese serve starting points for reflection and inspiration. This time, special attention will be given to the following original – and highly influential – personalities, including quite a lot of material from the “models” perspective, giving a profile for example of one of the pioneers who worked with Tsujimura in the 1950s, named Kawabata Tanako.

Kinbaku Salon with Berg Borg – New Date: 04. – 06.12.2020

TSUJIMURA TAKASHI
Tsujimura Takashi (1921–1987) was the main Bakushi for the magazine Kitan Club for 25 years, with a huge impact on the development of modern Kinbaku.
In addition to tying, Tsujimura also contributed many interesting texts in different genres: erotic fiction, SM-theory, aesthetics, tutorials, and more. He had an interest for example in Hojojutsu and in the specific beauty of Kinbaku, but also a clear orientation towards the practical and personal activity of SM play.
In a series of texts and photos called “Camera Hunt”, published regularly for many years in Kitan Club and later continuing in the magazine SM King, Tsujimura puts the tied up women in focus, amateurs as well as professional models, interviewing them about their experiences.
Tsujimura also contributed to a number of big movie-productions. During this lecture we will see some examples of this, as well as section from a rare documentary about the Japanese SM-scene from 1971, where Tsujimura is interviewed.

OSADA EIKICHI
Osada Eikichi (1925–2001) has been called “father of the modern SM club show”. For people in the West, he is probably known mainly for the key role he played in the development of Osada Steve’s career as a Bakushi.
Osada Eikichi’s shows, as they began in the late 1960s through the activities of the “Osada Seminar” and then ran until the end of his life, were quite spectacular, full of energy and drama. Not only the person being tied, but everyone in the audience were overwhelmed by stimuli until they reached a state of disorientation. There were many interesting developments in the Japanese avantgarde theatre, dance and performance scene in the 1960s and 1970s that can be seen as part of the context for the emerging format of the SM show. Arguably, these shows also played a role for Akechi Denki taking his first steps as a performer.
Being a live performer more than anything else, material documenting Osada Eikichi’s work has long been hard to find. During this lecture, we will have a look at some printed material, listen to translated texts, have a peek at video in different genres (tutorials, live show, TV-appearance) as well reflect on testimony from interviews.

AKECHI DENKI
“In SM, Shibari is communication between two people using the medium of rope. It’s a connection made with rope between the hearts of two people.”
These words by Akechi Denki (1940–2005) have become famous – for good reasons. Akechi was a pioneer in several fields – as a creative rope-artist and a master performer. The distinctive style of Akechi, as a crucial inspiration for rope-artists such as Kanna and Osada Steve, has had quite some influence on the European rope-scene. Akechi was also the first Japanese rope-artist that came to Europe to perform, in 1998.
Through some texts where Akechi tells about his life, the lecture will trace his itinerary from his childhood and youth in a Japan defined by the war and the post-war sufferings, to his break-through as a rope-performer in the 1980s.
Hit by a heart-attack when he was 19 years old, Akechi was told by the doctor that he would probably not live to see his 30th birthday. He recalls his reaction: “If I lived each day with double intensity, even though I may die when I am 30, it would be the same as dying when I was sixty.”
Drawing on a wealth of materials such as texts and images from old magazines, VHS-tapes and later DVDs, we will examine the development of Akechi’s style and try to understand his outlook.

This will be weekend of reflection and learning, but also of pleasure. Bring an open mind, a pen and a notebook. And of course, bring your ropes …

Bergborg’s approach to rope is coloured by his background in contact-improvisation as well as his work as an academic researcher in the humanities. On his blog Kinbaku Books, he shares parts of his collection of historical Kinbaku-material with the larger rope-community.
Bergborg is packing his bags with rare materials from the 1950s until today. There will be photos, artwork, translated texts, movies, and excerpts from original interviews not yet published.

For whom is it?

The Kinbaku Salon is for rope enthusiasts who want to know more about the history of Japanese Bondage and get a feel for some of the most influential characters in this history. If you have the slightest fetish for old books and magazines, there will be a lot of rare stuff to enjoy.

What is in for me?

You will get original material presented in a context that allows you to develop your understanding and appreciation of three pioneers in the history of Kinbaku: Tsujimura, Osada Eikichi, and Akechi Denki, from the 1950s until today.

You will get the chance to formulate your own questions and have conversations with a knowledgable lecturer as well as with the other participants.

You will get insights about the lines of connection to the present, for example to the work of Kanna, Osada Steve, Pedro, and other contemporary Japanese and non-Japanese masters.

You will get to socialize and have fun with ropes in a group of fellow rope-enthusiasts.

Formalities:

  • Small group of max. 15 Enthusiasts
  • Tea, coffee, cold drinks, snacks and finger food at the evenings are provided
  • Location: Studio 6×6, Berlin-Moabit
  • Language: English (contact us, when you are interested but need a translation)

Contribution:

145 € per Person for the Kinbaku Salon, inclusive Open Space / Play Night

15 € Partners / additional People for Kinbaku Play Night (partners are invited on Friday after 22:00)

Content & Schedule

Friday 4th December

19:30–20:00 Welcome

20:00–22:00 Introductory lecture on Tsujimura Takashi

22:00–23:30 Open space for tying or socializing

Saturday 5th December

11:00–14:30 Lecture on Osada Eikichi

14:30–16:00 LUNCH BREAK

16:00–19:00 Lecture on Akechi Denki #1

19:00–20:30 DINNER BREAK

20:30–23:30 Kinbaku Play Night / Open Space for tying

Sunday 6th December

11:00–14:30 Lecture on Akechi Denki #2

14:30–16:00 LUNCH BREAK

16:00–17:00ish Questions, Answers and Finger Food

All weekend long: Exhibition of original collectors items (books, artwork, etc)

Bring along: an open mind, a pen and a notebook – and your ropes.

For the Kinbaku Play Night / Open space for tying we offer a cosy studio with Tatami, Futons, Five Bamboo and one Hashira for those who got inspired.

FAQ

Is this a practical workshop or just theory?

The lectures will be interactive, offering space for reflection, using multiple media, printed materials, pictures, video. Also, there will be a chance to get inspired and tie during the evening’s „open spaces“

Do I need a partner for this workshop?

No. But you can bring your partner for the Kinbaku Play Night / Open Space event at the evenings

I am interested in the history of Kinbaku, but I do not intent to tie / getting tied myself. Do I fit in?

Absolutely. There is nothing you „have to“ do. There is room for socializing, discussions, to observe and learn or to exchange with other’s. Even during the practical exercises or for the Kinbaku Play Night it is totally ok to just watch respectfully.

There were other influential people in the Japanese Rope Scene – why are they not covered?

This weekend we decided to focus on three pioneers who were highly influential to the Kinbaku scene in general. Bergborg offers special lectures dedicated also to other great Kinbaku artists – we will welcome him back, for sure…